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PBS
Oct 20, 2012 5:00am EDT
nice story to end with. our thanks to everyone here in stranraer. i hope that you'll join us next week when we're in leicestershire. until then, good-bye. captions by: midwest captioning des moines, ia >> "bbc news night." funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers use their expertise in global finance to guide you through the business strategies and opportunities of international commerce. we put our extended global network to work for a wide range of companies, from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> the far right is on the march in greece. the leader of an extremist party tells newsnight about their rise in support among the guardians of the state. >> i think with what they are saying now, we have more than 60% at of them following us. >> she is the daughter of a former president. could she also be the daughter of a future one? we asked chelsea clinton it if her mother should to case shot at the
PBS
Oct 23, 2012 1:00am EDT
begin in just a few seconds. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks will be watching with us here in the studio, along with our colleague jeffrey brown, newshour political editor christina bellantoni, and presidential historian michael beschloss. we'll hear from all of them after the debate, when we'll also be joined by ari shapiro and scott horsley of npr. they are at lynn university. >> ifill: we're also streaming the debate online and offering additional content on our live blog. >> woodruff: and here now is tonight's moderator, bob schieffer of cbs news. from the campus of lynn university here in boca raton, florida. this is the fourth and last debate of the 2012 campaign brought to you by the commission on presidential debates. this one is on foreign policy. i'm bob schieffer of cbs news. the questions are mine. and i have not shared them with the candidates or their aides. the audience has taken a vow of silence. no applause, no reaction of any kind except right now when we welcome president barack obama and governor mitt romney. (applause) >> thank you. >> thank you, good t
PBS
Oct 7, 2012 4:00pm EDT
columbus syndrome because every four years they rediscover us, hispani hispanics, and then they forget about us for three years and then they rediscover us again. >> announcer: funding is provided by carnegie corporation of new york, celebrating 100 years of philanthropy and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the coalberg foundation, independent production fund with support from the partridge foundation, a john and poly guff fund. the cla meant foundation, park foundation. dedicated to heightening public awareness to public issues. the herb al per the foundation. their mission is to promote compassion in our society. the john d. and kathryn t. mcarthur foundation committed to building a more just, and peaceful world. more information at mak found.org. the bess see and jessie fink foundation. the h.k.h. foundation. barbara g. fleischmann and by our sole corporate sponsor, mutual of america, designing customized, individual, and group retirement products. that's kwl we're your retirement company. >>> welcome. millions of us were waiting this week for mitt romney and
PBS
Oct 23, 2012 11:00pm EDT
due toarls from us. they want to participate but they also want to be listened to. >> i am not even sure where the word leader hip is a good word to describe the role america should play in the world. we should be playing the stabilizing role. we should be organizing our coalitions, we should be a source of stability, but when we talk about leadership, too many people think of the iraq and 2003, which was a fatally bad exercise of leadership. >> rose: we conclude this evening with dexter filkins of the new yorker magazine who has a remarkable story about death in iraq and reunion in the united states. >> the i interviewed a guy in the peace, a psychiatrist who used the term moral injury and he said a lot of soldiers and marines stuff from moral injury, which he described as sort of it happens when you get an order, you do something that you believe at the time was absolutely correct and the only thing you could do, and it turns out to have been, to have terrible consequences. that is basically what happened here. >> rose: american foreign policy and a dexter filkins story. when we c
PBS
Oct 10, 2012 6:00pm EDT
it's constitutional for universities to use race in deciding who they admit. the suit was brought by abigail fisher-- a white, honor roll student who was denied admission at the university of texas at austin in 2008. fisher, now 22, was in the court chamber today and later spoke briefly to reporters. >> i hope the court rules that a student's race and ethnicity should not be considered when applying to the university of texas. >> ifill: her lawyer, bert rein, said it comes down to equal protection under the law. >> we've recognized that there are some interests in diversity that are beneficial in the educational sphere. but we have said and we continue to say that is not an overriding consideration that has to be administered very narrowly because it's an odious and dangerous classification. >> ifill: but university president bill powers argued that concern is trumped by the need for a diverse student body. >> we believe the educational benefits of diversity are so important that they're worth fighting for all way to the united states supreme court. our lawyers this morning effective
PBS
Oct 23, 2012 7:00pm EDT
non- essential assets. others are using the weak quarter as an opportunity to clean up their balance sheets. >> everything but the kitchen sink. you are going to take every write-down, every mark down, everything that you can. get it out of the way, so you look better in the following quarter. >> reporter: but hopes are fading for a strong finish to the year. of the companies that have provided earnings guidance for the fourth quarter, 22 have been negative and only two have been positive. >> companies are already warning us not to expect too much from them for the fourth quarter. we've received the most negative guidance since we started collecting this data in history. >> reporter: the weak global economy isn't just bad news for big multinational firms; it is forcing many to tighten their belts by limiting hiring and investment, and that's bad news for workers and investors alike. erika miller, nbr, new york. >> susie: so, is today's market sell-off the start of something bigger? alec young joins us with his thoughts. he's global equity strategist at s&p capital i.q. >> sus
PBS
Oct 31, 2012 7:00pm EDT
knocked down the financial district. us stock markets resumed operations today after two days in the dark, stocks were little changed: both the dow and the nasdaq fell 10 points, but the s&p 500 gained a fraction. trading here at the new york stock exchange opened without a hitch. the new york stock exchange opened right on time. and as new york's mayor bloomberg rang the opening bell this morning, traders were happy to be back to work. it looked like a normal day, with the buzz of activity, traders milling about. it was anything but normal no one knows that better than larry leibowitz, the head of the nyse's floor operations. he's has been working with the exchange's staff for four straight days, and he even slept in his office last night to make sure the big board would be up and running today. >> we and the rest of the market are in great shape. it's surprising, almost surprising how great shape not just us but the rest of the market is, given how much potential disruption there was. >> reporter: still the internet and cell phones were not working. many traders rely on their cell
PBS
Oct 12, 2012 1:00am EDT
college in danville, kentucky. mark shields and david brooks are here with us and after the debate we will talk to newshour political editor christina bellatoni to presidential historian michael burb love plus jonathan martin of "politico" and sam youngman of routers will join us from the debate site. we'll also be streaming the debate on-line and offering additional content on our live blog. >> woodruff: and we are on the edge of our seats and now here's the moderator martha raddatz. >> good evening and welcome to the first and only vice presidential debate of 2012 sponsored by the commission on presidential debate. i'm martha raddatz of abc news. and i am db -- i'm honored to moderate this debate between two men who have dedicated much of their lives to public service. tonight's debate is divide between domestic and foreign policy issues. and i'm going to move back and forth between foreign and domestic since that is what a vice president or president would have to do. we will have nine different segments. at the beginning of each segment i will ask both candidates a question and
PBS
Oct 8, 2012 7:00pm EDT
national security threats, warning their technology equipment could be used for spying. >> susie: i'm susie gharib. it's that time of year again, earnings season, we look at what wall street's expecting from third quarter results. >> tom: and speaking of seasons, it's already looking a lot like christmas for the nation's retailers. this year could be the best ever for online holiday shopping. >> susie: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> tom: two of china's top telecommunications companies are a threat to u.s. national security. that's the conclusion of the u.s. house intelligence committee after a year-long investigation into emerging technology giants z.t.e. and huawei. huawei says the report relies on rumors and speculation, and the company warns a trade battle could cost the jobs of thousands of workers in the united states. but, as darren gersh reports, there is growing bipartisan agreement that this is the right time to get tough on chinese cyber-theft. >> reporter: in unusually blunt language the bipartisan leadership of the house committee warned u.s. companies not to buy th
PBS
Oct 8, 2012 6:00pm EDT
prosperous middle east allied with us. i hope this hope but hope is not a strategy. >> woodruff: with that mitt romney took aim at foreign policy today in a speech at virginia military institute in lexington, virginia. >> when we look at the middle east today, with iran closer than ever to nuclear weapons capability with the conflict in syria threatening to destabilize the region and with violent extremists on the march and with an american ambassador and three others dead likely at the hands of al qaeda affiliates it's clear that the risk of conflict in the region is higher now than when the president took office. >> woodruff: that last point involved the assault on the u.s. consulate in benghazi libya and the death of ambassador chris stevens on the night of september 11. the administration initially blamed an anti-muslim film for inciting the trouble. more recently officials have said new information indicates it was a terrorist attack. today romney again criticized the president's response in libya. >> i want to be very clear. the blame for the murder of our people in libya and the att
PBS
Oct 29, 2012 5:30pm EDT
union bank, our relationship managers work hard -- use their expertise to guide you through the strategies and opportunities of international commerce. we put our extended global network to work for a wide range of companies, from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now "bbc world news america." >> this is "bbc world news america." hurricane sandy bears down on the u.s. east coast bringing with it walls of water and if he robberies winds. millions are in its -- and ferocious winds. nervous residents heed the warning to stay indoors. and with just weeks away until election day, sandy sends the presidential contest for a loop. no one wants to play politics in this storm. >> welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. hurricane sandy, one of the biggest storms ever to hit the united states, is bearing down on the east coast. nine states stretching from north carolina to connecticut have declared a state of emergency. 50 million people live in the storm's path. usually bustling cities have been brought to a stand st
PBS
Oct 24, 2012 5:30pm EDT
bank, our relationship managers use their expertise in global finance to guide you through the business strategies and opportunities of international commerce. we put our extended global network to work for a wide range of companies, from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> this is bbc world news america. amid the seas -- amid talk of a cease-fire in syria or on the ground the death toll continues to rise. and the female factor, as each side tries to win the vote. we find out what is driving the decision. and want an inventor? we have just a place for you. you have to be ready for a trip -- want an adventure? we have just the place for you. you have to be ready for a trip to afghanistan. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and also of around the globe. tonight, the syrian government is studying a proposal for the a cease-fire to take place this weekend. earlier, the u.n. posing mediator said a truce -- the u.n. mediator said a truce had actually been agreed to. here is this report. >> in rebel-held
PBS
Oct 11, 2012 6:00pm EDT
in new york on tuesday. joining us for the debate later tonight and here now to preview what to expect are two familiar faces syndicated columnist mark shields and "new york times" columnist david brooks. >> well, if you look at the polls after the first debate, then it's magnified in part because of the way the democrats reacted, a pollster told my friend e.j. dionne that when republicans hate a poll they want to kill the posters, when democrats hate a poll they want to kill themselves. so they've been reacting with this emotion which has been magnifyed with the effect and so the momentum for romney roy ryeian has continued. so this is the night you will either accelerate that momentum or reverse it. >> republicans, judy, who just ten days ago were savaging all polls as part of the ann sister liberal conspiracy to discourage the romney ryan are now trumpeting them. every survey that comes out there's no question there's been a total change in morale in the two -- in into t entire campaign. >> woodruff: just in a week. >> just in a week. the president didn't show up last week, h
PBS
Oct 30, 2012 9:30pm EDT
stake is the future of america. >> it costs us, and taxes us, too much. >> american future fund is responsible for the content of this advertising. >> ryssdal: i knew right away this wasn't going to be the usual story on campaign finance. one of the first surprises was finding myself driving the dark streets of denver with attorney alan schwartz, who shared kind of a strange experience. >> it was early january of 2011, and my wife, who had just been reelected to the colorado state senate, got an e-mail from someone who claimed to have some information about a group that had sent out some attack ads against my wife. >> ryssdal: the guy said he had some documents, and a week later... >> i heard from this individual again. still not identifying himself, but telling me that if i wanted to see the documents, then i needed to get them that day. >> ryssdal: had to be that day. >> had to be that day. >> ryssdal: schwartz agreed to meet the guy who said the documents were stashed in a safe house that he would take him to. >> i didn't know where were going. for the half-hour that we drove fr
PBS
Oct 5, 2012 7:00pm EDT
week. >> susie: joining us now with more anaysis on that jobs report... mark zandi...chief economist at moody's analytics. great to see you, mark. tell us about this 7.8%. does this mark the turning point in the job market? >> well, susie toverstates the case. i don't think the job market improved that much in the month of september. but i do think the job market is improving. it's improving enough to bring down unemployment. we're moving in the right direction but not quite as quickly as the data today would suggest. >> susie: 114,000 new jobs i mean, it's nice people are getting jobs, but it's flota really robust number, is it? what is it telling us about the labor market? >> right. 114,000 is okay. but it isn't robust. i think, though, as you kind of take a step back, look at job gains over the past six months, over the past year, over the past couple of years, we're getting job growth of about 150,000 per month. that's okay. in a normal economy we'd be pretty happy with that, but in this economy, where we have a high rate of unemployment and we want to get that down, 15
PBS
Oct 1, 2012 5:30pm EDT
people. but just how far is all the rhetoric got us? i'm joined here in the studio by steve from the u.s. institute of peace. steve, thank you very much indeed for coming in. listening to muallem's speech, what sort of insight does it give us into the way the syrian regime is thinking right now? >> well, the foreign minister repeated almost verbatim what they called this uprising from the very beginning. they depicted it as driven by foreign elements, as a conspiracy against the syrian people, against the syrian nation, and it's a way of denying any legitimacy to the claims of the opposition and rejecting the possibility that the regime itself might have some culpability for the violence that has racked syria for the past 18 months, if not longer. so they've developed this as a way to fend off any responsibility and to shift the blame onto others. unfortunately they found support for their narrative including russia and iran and that has not got them to see things in a way more willing to talk about the possibility for change. >> also, very strong words about the u.s., which, of cour
PBS
Oct 2, 2012 7:00pm EDT
, joins us. >> tom: and why some american manufacturers think an economic slowdown could be on the way. >> susie: that and more tonight on nbr! it's only october, but at stores around the country, it's beginning to look a lot like christmas. the national retail federation is predicting a 4.1% gain in holiday sales. that would not be as good as last year, but still above the ten-year average. but as erika miller explains, there's greater uncertainty than usual in the forecasts. >> reporter: past the halloween decorations, the candy, and costumes, you will find the artificial trees, wreaths, and tinsel. stores like this kmart are displaying christmas merchandise early, hoping for a greater share of holiday spending. >> they are coming in and looking at the trees and getting the thought in their mind that christmas is coming, and start to think, "what can i start shopping for now?" >> reporter: but forecasters say it's more difficult than usual to predict consumer spending this holiday season. the big wild card is the presidential election. >> this is the most difficult year we've eve
PBS
Oct 4, 2012 7:00pm EDT
: here's where the president gets that $5 trillion number he used again today. governor romney's plan to cut tax rates by 20% would add up to about $5 trillion over ten years, assuming no other changes. but governor romney is planning to make other changes by eliminating tax deductions worth about the same amount. but the president is accurate when he says governor romney is making many promises in his tax plan. romney says upper-income people will not get a net tax cut; middle-income people will not see their taxes go up; incentives for savings and investment won't be touched; the estate tax and alternative minimum tax will be eliminated-- all this while cutting tax rates and not changing the amount of money the federal government brings in. an analysis by the tax policy center shows governor romney will have to make some big tradeoffs. >> so, governor romney has made five promises. he can't keep them all. he is going to have to, at some point, abandon one of those promises. he cannot cut tax rates, cut taxes on the middle class, cut taxes on capital gains, and balance the budge
PBS
Oct 31, 2012 6:00pm EDT
, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the u.s. death toll from the giant storm named sandy has risen to at least 63 today. about 6.5 million homes and businesses are still without electricity though there were signs of daily life returning to its usual rhythm in some places. a familiar sound returned to lower manhattan streets last night. ( horns honking ) the power did not. police helped direct traffic with signals still dark, but one taxi driver said it wasn't worth the risk. >> it's been dangerous. i've got to go home, i'll walk. there's no traffic signal light, no nothing there. >> woodruff: you're going home? you're done? >> i'm done already. >> woodruff: it wasn't much easier for pedestrians who made their way on foot, some with only flashlights leading the way. >> it's really unsettling because we don't have power. we don't know what's going on. w
PBS
Oct 1, 2012 6:00pm EDT
, marcia coyle of the "national law journal" walks us through a term that will tackle affirmative action, and may decide disputes over same-sex marriage and civil rights law. >> woodruff: then we turn to the presidential campaign and the analysis of stuart rothenberg and susan page as the candidates fine tune their messages days before the first debate. >> brown: we zero in on one issue confronting the candidates. hari sreenivasan reports on the safety net program known as medicaid. >> anyone of us at an advanced age really is just one fall away from a broken hip that could end you up in a nursing home. >> woodruff: ray suarez talks with author hedrick smith. his new book explores the dismantling of the american dream for the middle class. >> brown: and we look at oppression and empowerment for women around the world, with journalists and filmmakers nicholas kristof and sheryl wudunn. >> once you give a woman education and a chance to work, she can astound you. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy
PBS
Oct 28, 2012 4:00pm EDT
the sacrifices you're going to ask of us? where are you going to get the money that we need in a way that won't tank the economy, that will increase the likelihood of economic growth?" and so, the problem now facing the country and the candidates is we're going to elect a candidate who is going to govern by asking us to make choices that we haven't anticipated. and as a result, we're going to feel betrayed to some extent, even if we voted for that candidate. >> the debates were the most watched in a long time. your field intersects politics and entertainment. do you think entertainment values had something to do with this? >> well, i think suspense was what was required down to the wire. and that's what we got. one won one, another won another. then a couple of draws. what could be better for keeping people watching? unfortunately, the lack of an answer to who sacrifices what is only the beginning of an endless list that, for me, is a reason to be disappointed, not just in the debates, but in the entire campaign. i want to find out about things that are important, about plutocracy ta
PBS
Oct 29, 2012 6:00pm EDT
razor-close election, but who is watching us and how much do they know about us? >> ifill: jeffrey brown talks with author bill ivey about his prescription for remaking america's democracy. >> well, i think what we need is to rediscover progressive values and put them forward. i'm arguing for not bigger government but i think different government. >> woodruff: and scott schaefer of public television's kqed profiles a photographer who uses google's street view images to create art. >> you have this distinct feeling of decay. the images almost challenge the viewer. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... friends of the newshour. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station fr
PBS
Oct 9, 2012 9:00pm EDT
." they had eight or ten motorcycle police officers there to guide us through the mobs of people at the site. >> narrator: it was 47-year-old mitt romney's first campaign. >> and mitt just has this big smile on his face, and he looks at me and goes, "boy, however this turns out, this really makes it worth it." >> narrator: the race had been close. romney needed a great performance. >> i don't think he had any idea what it was going to be like, because he had never done debates under that pressure. >> narrator: he'd gotten into the race because kennedy looked weak, beatable. >> at the time ted kennedy seemed vulnerable. it was a weak period for kennedy. he looked bad, he sounded bad, and in that way he was vulnerable. >> narrator: he was dramatically overweight. there had been trouble with alcohol and women. he'd mortgaged his house to stay in the race. >> romney was everything ted kennedy was not. you know, he had this clean family life. he was a really good speaker. he was really athletic and he had a good kind of campaign visage. >> people knew that he had gone to harvard business sch
PBS
Oct 15, 2012 6:00pm EDT
: >> computing surrounds us. sometimes it's obvious and sometimes it's very surprising in where you find it. soon, computing intelligence in unexpected places will change our lives in truly profound ways. technology can provide customized experiences tailored to individual consumer preferences, igniting a world of possibilities from the inside out. sponsoring tomorrow, starts today. >> bnsf railway. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: president obama and mitt romney spent this day getting ready for their second debate, where questions will come directly from voters. as they did, new polls underscored what's riding on the outcome. from the obama and romney camp came signs of just how high the stakes will be tomorrow night. republican vice presidential candidate paul ryan talked up the coming confrontation as he campaigned in cincinatti. >> these debates are giving us the ability to cut through
PBS
Oct 24, 2012 4:00am EDT
. >> hockenberry: republican congressman james sensenbrenner of wisconsin, vice chairman of the use science committee. >> paul krugman accused my colleagues and me of treason against the planet. (laughter) >> hockenberry: there's chris horner from the competitive enterprise institute... >> ...economic salvation. this is our way out. >> hockenberry: and james taylor, senior fellow at the heartland institute, organizer of this gathering. >> the debate indeed is over. in the years prior to 2007, the 2008 elections, we actually heard from many folks that we should tone it down on global warming, we should not talk about the issue, because the court of public opinion had already decided and we were on the losing end. but we believe that if we present the case to the american people and it resonates, if they get it, then that's going to work its way up the political stepladder. >> hockenberry: you've really changed the game on global warming. >> oh, i certainly hope so. >> hockenberry: these political messengers rely on a small group of outspoken scientific contrarians, like climatologist pat mic
PBS
Oct 21, 2012 4:00pm EDT
down on us. an uncaged tiger on a rampage. walk out to the street in front of our office and turn right, and you can see the symbol of it. a fancy new skyscraper, going up two blocks away. when finished, this high rise among high rises will tower 1,000 feet. the tallest residential building in the city. "the new york times" has dubbed it the global billionaire's club, and for good reason. at least two of the apartments are under contract for more than $90 million each. others, more modest, range in price from $45 million to more than $50 million. simultaneously, the powers that be have just awarded donald trump, yes, that donald trump, the right to run a golf course in the bronx which taxpayers are spending at least $97 million to build. what amounts to a public subsidy, says the indignant city comptroller for a luxury golf course. good grief. a handout to the pollute contracts. this is a city where economic inequality rivals that of a third world country. of america's 25 largest cities new york is now the most unequal. the median income for the bottom 20% last year was less than $9,000
PBS
Oct 26, 2012 5:30pm EDT
foundation and union bank. >> at unijob bank our relationship managers use their expertise to guide you through the business strategies and opportunities of international commerce. we put our extended global network to work for a wide range of companies from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, bbc "world news" america. >> this is bbc "world news" america. reporting from washington. a dramatic new chapter in the life of italy's former prime minister, silvio berlusconi, who was handed a prison sentence for fax fraud. there is cease-fire, and a massive bomb blast rocks the capital. you recognize these characters. we finds out what's drawing cartoonists to the presidential campaign. >> welcome to our viewers on public television in america and also around the globe. colorful, controversial and new convicted and sent to prison. silvio berlusconi has been found guilty of tax fraud. he said the conviction was a political judgment that he found to be incredible and intolerable. however, the multi-millionaire businessman may never sleep in a prison bed. ga
PBS
Oct 24, 2012 11:00pm EDT
it's the china that is used to american presidential politics, is used to being bashed on the presidential trail and, you know, it will go through it and it will just sit there and it will be another president who's coming in, we'll take time and come back. i think china has fundamentally changed. i think china now sees its much more as a -- has read some of this stuff about being a g-2 world and sees america somewhat closer to it and is less in the mood to take ultimatums. >> rose: we continue with appreciation of christopher hitchens with his widow carol blue and his editor and friend gray don carter. >> a number of young people, people in their 20s, mid-20s who really attached themselves to christopher, he hit something in them that hunter thompson had done in a generation before. he was very much a standard bearer for a younger generation of, you know, sort of armchair fire brands and he was the real thing and i think they admired him for it and sort of worshipped him. >> i think he was very, very stoic and he never really complained. he must have been in excruciating pain
PBS
Oct 2, 2012 11:00pm EDT
through commercials, the beginning has been abused, used, used in commercials, as a sort of funny piece or piece of -- full of joy, like an entertainment. >> rose: yes. >> but it is a very dramatic piece because it is a reflects the dark era, medieval era and being italian, you know, i am very familiar with this monastery or universities that are very old and carry this dark atmosphere, so the piece seems to exaggerate speaking about drinking, love, to make love, to drink, it is not for just for the pleasure of doing these things, but only through these things you can forget life, that is not something very nice. ♪ ♪ ♪ >> rose: was he controversial because of some of his political sympathies? >> this has been said, and some people still say, i think that first this was not very popular in the beginning. also because, you know, in a period where the people there felt that about the superior race, this and that, and that life is not at all happy, it is not wonderful and we are miserable, you know, there is nothing positive in this piece. then they changed mind and thought it was a p
PBS
Oct 31, 2012 4:00am EDT
officer came by and told us we had to get out of there. >> after that, the building collapsed into the sea. >> first of all, thanks for that. >> you're welcome. >> mechanic the coast guard rescued 14 crew members from the hms bounty. >> one crew member is still missing. >> the super storm is not just bringing rain dumping up to three feet of snow in three states, west virginia bearing the brunt of it. >> a travel nightmare all up and down the east coast. >> airports closed. >> is regis going to be able to go home? you heard from the mayor who said a number of people haven't left, that worries them. >> joggers wearing a horse mask. >> i am hot quite sure what that is all about. >> i was conceived during hurricane hazel. >> and all that matters -- >> hopefully your thoughts and friars will join with mine as you think about those folks who are in harm's way. >> we will get through this. >> on cbs this morning. we felt like we would be putting the audience at jeopardy if they had to sit through the show and i said hell we have been doing that for 30 years. >> look out! >> 30 years. >> come
PBS
Oct 1, 2012 7:00pm EDT
behind us. >> reporter: others, however, are more upbeat, saying the u.s. manufacturing sector is alive and well. they point to a growing number of american companies looking to bring back to the u.s. jobs lost to overseas. but, u.s. factories are actually suffering from a huge labor shortage. a recent study shows the manufacturing sector cannot find workers with the right skills to fill about 600,000 jobs. linda rigano of thomasnet.com says that's because manufacturing as a career choice needs a major makeover. >> if we view manufacturing as that dark, dirty place where people are just making um, they're making things, but it's dark and it's dirty and it's dank, and it's low paying, people won't want to go into that. instead if we talk about it as it really exists, manufacturing is an exciting place to be today. >> reporter: it may be exciting here in the u.s. but, in europe and china, manufacturing is losing steam. new reports show eurozone factories suffered their worst quarter in more than three years, while china's factory output contracted for the second straight month. suza
PBS
Oct 16, 2012 6:00pm EDT
-home pay or more job creation. it's not just about preventing a debt crisis from turning us into europe. it is about what kind of country we're going to be, what kind of people we're going to be. >> woodruff: and the obama campaign turned to former president clinton in a new web video charging the romney tax plan favors the wealthy. >> i know how this works. because i'm one of those folks. if i get governor romney's 20% income tax cut, you can take away my home mortgage deduction, my charitable deduction, my deduction for state and local taxes, and any other taxes that i have and i will still get a tax cut. >> woodruff: meanwhile debate arrangements were concluding at hofstra university on long island where 80 undecided vote voters, selected by gallup, will fill these seats. candy crowley, cnn's chief political correspondent, will moderate. in that role, she's selecting from questions submitted by the audience in advance. individual voters will ask their question. each candidate will get two minutes to respond. and just this afternoon, the commission on presidential debates annou
PBS
Oct 16, 2012 9:00pm EDT
will be watching with us here in the studio, along with our colleague jeffrey brown, political editor christina bellantoni, and presidential historian michael beschloss. we'll hear from all of them after the debate, when we'll also be joined by ari shapiro of npr and jonathon martin of politico. they are at hofstra. >> woodruff: we're also streaming the debate online and offering additional content on our live blog. and here, now, is tonight's moderator, candy crowley. >> crowley: good evening from hofstra university in hempstead, new york. i'm candy crowley from cnn's state of the union. we are here for the second presidential debate at town hall sponsored by the commission on presidential debates. the gallup organization chose 82 uncommittedded voters from the new york area. their questions will drive the night. my goal is to give the conversation direction and to ensure questions get answered the questions are known to me and my team only. neither the commission nor the candidates have seen them. i hope to get to as many questions as possible. because i am the optimistic sort, i'm
PBS
Oct 30, 2012 6:00pm EDT
been provided by: >> computing surrounds us. sometimes it's obvious and sometimes it's very surprising in where you find it. soon, computing intelligence in unexpected places will change our lives in truly profound ways. technology can provide customized experiences tailored to individual consumer preferences, igniting a world of possibilities from the inside out. sponsoring tomorrow, starts today. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... friends of the newshour. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the giant hybrid storm named sandy left a growing toll today. officials reported at least 39 people killed, and $20 billion or more in damage. the nation's most populous city and its surroundings were at the epicenter. new york is a city in shock today, even deserted in
PBS
Oct 19, 2012 5:30pm EDT
foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers use their expertise in global finance to guide you through the business strategies and opportunities of international commerce. we put our extended global network to work for a wide range of companies, from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> this is "bbc world news america," from washington. a massive bomb blast rips through the heart of beirut. fears that the violence and syria has spilled over into lebanon. the u.s. presidential candidates blanket their base. an actress makes a big impression on the silver screen. she takes it all in stride. >> it is great to have that attention but not too much. i don't want to get too excited. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. there are fears that the conflict in service is spilling over. an official has been killed by a huge car bomb in beirut. the leading opponent is bashar al-assad. syria's leader is being accused of being behind the bombing. >> they rushed to eastern be
PBS
Oct 25, 2012 7:00pm EDT
dominating certain categories has passed. >> we used to say there's no tablet market, there's just an ipad market. done, over. amazon, google, on the second tier, people like barnes and noble, samsung-- there's serious competition now, and they're taking more and more of the market. >> reporter: the timely launch of the iphone 5 and ipad mini sets the stage for a huge quarter for apple in the last few months of this year. the company is counting on at least one apple product under the tree this christmas. suzanne pratt, nbr, new york. >> susie: microsoft is also banking on big christmas sales. it unveiled its much anticipated new operating system, windows 8, here in new york city, and showed off its new tablet, the surface. the operating system's key feature-- an ability to work across all computers: tablets, laptops and desktops. over one billion hours of testing time went into the new operating system and the surface tablet. c.e.o. steve ballmer calls them a milestone in computing. >> with windows 8, we've brought together the best of worlds-- the p.c. and the tablet; your work, lif
PBS
Oct 24, 2012 7:00pm EDT
.," washington. >> susie: for more analysis on that fed decision, diane swonk joins us, she's chief economist at mesirow financial. so, the fed is sticking to its plan, no real surprises today. did anything stand out for you? >> you know, there really wasn't much that stood out. i think that was important. the real issue here is that the fed is still continuing to be sort of a certainty in this ocean of uncertainty for both consumers and investors alike, saying we're willing to leave that punch bowl out that a little longer than anybody thought and maybe get some people tipsy. >> there wasn't much market reaction to the fed decision. do you think the message of the markets is there is really not much more that the fed can do to fix the economy? >> i don't think the fed is out of bullets at all, nor do they. they think every time they do something, they need to do more. and the federal reserve is certainly going to make another announcement in december to compensate for the end of what they call the twist. chubby checker's song, "the twist." they're going to continue to buy more treasury bonds an
PBS
Oct 23, 2012 3:00am EDT
threat we face. russia does continue to battle us in the u.n. time and time again, i have clear eyes on, this i am not going to wear rose colored glasses when it wears to russia and mr. but putin and not say to himly give you more flexibility after the election. >> one of the challenges over the last decade as we have done experiments in nation building in places like iraq and afghanistan and neglected for example developing our own economy, our own energy sectors, our own education system. >> sportsdesk to be able to fulfill our role in the world, america must be strong. america must lead. and for that to happen, we have to strengthen our exhibit here at home. >> he doesn't have different ideas and that is because we are doing exactly what we should be doing. >> come on our web site and look at how we get to a balanced budget within eight to ten years, we do it by getting, by reducing spending and a whole series of programs. >> it just doesn't work and we visited the web site quite a bit and it still doesn't work. >> rose: let me get back to foreign policy. can i just get back? >> we h
PBS
Oct 22, 2012 6:00pm EDT
left at the end of september. here with us now to preview what to expect tonight are syndicated columnist mark shields and "new york times" columnist david brooks. if i had said to either of you six weeks ago that everything in this election would be so tight that it would depend on the third foreign policy debate, what would you have said to me? >> surprise. and advantage obama. now i should say i think the underlying tenor of the past week has been shifting toward romney. there's been a slight momentum shift towards the challenger over the last week. that puts a little more pressure on obama. nonetheless i do think this is his natural home turf. he's talked about foreign policy a lot more than mitt romney. it's his chance to really deliver a serious blow. for mitt romney, the idea i think for tonight is just to come out with a tie. just kind of look presidential. don't scare anybody. just, you know, he has much lower ambitions i think. >> ifill: what do you think about that, mark? is it more important for whoever wins this debate to come out with a detailed grasp of foreign po
PBS
Oct 19, 2012 7:00pm EDT
to be any mercy, which simply probably tells us in a broad sense that stocks are to a large extent almost priced to perfection. >> susie: corporate america may be down about its future prospects, but american consumers are beginning to feel more upbeat. consumer confidence is at its highest level in seven months. why the disconnect and should investors be concerned about these out of sync views? erika miller reports. >> reporter: for years now, corporate america has been thriving, while consumers have been struggling. but now it seems, the tables have turned. businesses are worrying, while regular americans are feeling more hopeful. first, the worry warts. since the start of earnings season, a host of companies have reported disappointing numbers, including general electric, mcdonalds, google, microsoft and alcoa. across the board, companies are getting slammed by a weak global economy, particularly in europe. >> we know that the european debt crisis is still highly impacting companies and, for the most part, there's really no sector that's been able to benefit from growth there ve
PBS
Oct 4, 2012 3:00am EDT
building right here at home. >> that future is out there, it is waiting for us. >> tonight the special edition of charlie rose. >> rose: welcome to our program. we're live this evening from new york, denver los angeles and washington. president obama and governor romney faced off tonight in the first of three debates before election day on november 6th. domestic policy was in focus during the 90-minute showdown at the university of denver. the platform gave govern romney an opportunity to reignite his campaign which has suffered some this summer. they sparred across a range of issues. >> there's a various done of small businesses across the country saying what's the effect of obamacare in your hiring plans. three quarters said it makes us less likely to hire people. i just don't know how the president could come into office, facing 23 million people out of work, rising unemployment and economic crises at the kitchen table, and spend his energy and passion for two years fighting for obamacare instead of fighting for jobs for the american people. >> the irony is that we've seen this mode
PBS
Oct 26, 2012 11:00pm EDT
. >> murder employment. >> sky-- skyfall. >> skyfall. done. >> some pen are coming to kill us. >> rose: you have seen the trailer before. >> no, i have now. >> rose: i want to go see this movie now. >> me too i will go i think a week tonight. >> rose: why. >> because it's the premier. i will save it till then. >> rose: you can't just show up and to the go to the premier, can you. you can't do the red something, carpet. >> i will be-- . >> rose: there are those, did you feel that this was special when you were making it, you have done a bit of these but this one somehow was going somewhere different. >> i heard it was a terrific script. and i met barbara and sam men dense-- mendes. >> he's directing it. >> i met them before and they told me what was going to happen, but which i can't say of course otherwise i shall be shot at dawn. >> rose: and i will not say, because i promised. >> no, quite. and they said but you have a terrific go and you come out of that office and behind your desk and you have a bill of a go. >> so you said that's enough for you. >> that's enough. >> i'm on. >> yes
PBS
Oct 15, 2012 7:00pm EDT
u.s. >> reporter: spectrum is pretty simple. it's the radio waves use to transmit things like radio and television broadcasts, police communications and now wireless data. and demand for it exploding. an industry report shows by the end of last year, more than 111 million smartphones and similar devices were being used in the u.s. that's up 43% from the year before. telecom expert john mayo says demand for data grew by more than 300% last year. he says smartphones use around 40 times the spectrum of traditional cell phones. tablets use around 120 times the traditional amount. but space on the airwaves is limited and right now it's getting more and more crowded. >> rather than thinking of this as us running out of spectrum, the better way to think about this is that the demands for spectrum, the demands for more spectrum, will make it more and more scarce, and unfortunately, if it continues to get more and more scarce, it will put upward pressure on the pricing of wireless services. >> reporter: the federal government has introduced initiatives that would ease congestion in cyberspac
PBS
Oct 13, 2012 5:00am EDT
next week showed that far from the deal being struck neatly, there was a us secret secret -- there is a secret second stage to the standoff with massive implications for the world. >> the cuban missile crisis did not end on october 28, 1962. cuba was going to become a nuclear power right under the nose of the american state, 90 miles from florida. >> there was a lot of potential for at least another three weeks. we were still at the highest state of alert short of nuclear war. >> i call on chairman khrushchev. he has an opportunity to move the world back from the abyss of destruction. >> people around the world breathed a huge sigh of relief when the soviet president nikita khrushchev agreed to withdraw missiles from cuba. in return, president kennedy pledged the united states would not invade cuba and would withdraw its medium-range nuclear missiles from turkey. it appeared the moment of danger had passed. but new documents shortly to be published from the archives of christoph's deputy during the crisis tell a different story. this woman describes the contents. >> what these decl
PBS
Oct 10, 2012 5:30pm EDT
where you are and where you think you are. for most of us, it might not matter that much. for some, pinpoint navigation could be a matter of life and death. the more we have come to rely on satnav, in fact, anything involving satellite technology, the more critically important research like this has become. ideally, they will work out a way of forecasting the most damaging effects. there is still a lot of mystery about the sun, how it disturbs the atmosphere, and what that means for us, but this is where we will start to get some answers. >> ok. i always knew that maps were the best thing. that brings our program to a close. if you like to find me, fine dust on t -- find us on twitter. from all of us, thanks for watching. i'll see you back here tomorrow. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new
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